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Top 10 Best and Worst Places To Be A Police Officer

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Top 10 Best and Worst Places to Become a Police Officer By States

Police and Sheriff’s Patrol Officers are the third most in-demand profession in the Homeland Security sector.

There is projected need for 265,000 officers by the end of 2014; but that is not to say that some states have a higher need than others.

The following is a guide to help you navigate, state by state, the law enforcement employment gauntlet.

Top 10 Best Paying Police Jobs By State

(These stats are based off of mean salaries ending in the year 2006)

State — Wage
1. New Jersey — $33.88
2. California — $33.12
3. Illinois — $28.81
4. Washington — $28.48
5. Nevada — $27.74
6. Alaska — $26.98
7. Connecticut — $26.72
8. Pennsylvania — $25.76
9. Colorado — $25.57
10. Oregon — $24.76

States not reporting: New York and District of Columbia

Top 10 Worst Paying Police Jobs by State

(These stats are based off of mean salaries ending in the year 2006)

State — Wage
1. Mississippi — $13.59
2. Arkansas — $13.67
3. Louisiana — $13.75
4. Oklahoma — $13.88
5. Tennessee — $15.26
6. Missouri — $15.39
7. West Virginia — $15.44
8. Vermont — $15.64
9. Alabama — $15.80
10. South Dakota — $16.07

States not reporting: New York and District of Colombia

Top 10 States By Highest Expected Police Job Growth (between 2006 – 2016)

(These stats are based off of job growth expectations ending in the year 2006)

State — # of New Jobs
1. California — 12,700
2. Florida — 7,450
3. Georgia — 3,530
4. Arizona — 2,840
5. New York — 2,820
6. North Carolina — 2,720
7. Colorado — 2,280
8. Tennessee — 2,280
9. Ohio — 2,240
10. Missouri — 2,070

States not reporting: Kansas, Texas, Virginia, District of Colombia

Top 10 States By Lowest Expected Police Job Growth (between 2006 – 2016)

(These stats are based off of job growth expectations ending in the year 2006)

State — # of New Jobs
1. North Dakota — 80
2. Rhode Island — 120
3. South Dakota — 120
4. Alaska — 160
5. Wyoming — 160
6. Hawaii — 220
7. West Virginia — 220
8. Vermont — 230
9. Maine — 320
10. Delaware — 340

States not reporting: Kansas, Texas, Virginia, District of Colombia

Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics, Office of Occupational Statistics and Employment Projections; the Labor Market Information Office within the State Employment Security Agency

Note: The data for the State Trends and the National Trends tables are not directly comparable. The employment projections period for State Trends is 2004-2014, while the period for National Trends is 2006-2016.

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About The Author
el2 Top 10 Best and Worst Places To Be A Police Officer

Officer Forestal has a bachelor's degree in criminal justice, 8 years law enforcement experience and is a graduate of the 2002 Police Corps, where he was recognized as an expert shooter. Former Collegiate all-American, certifield personal trainer and author of several fitness and police related books such as the Police Oral Interview Secrets, and Police Exam For Dummies. As a Law Enforcement enthusiast, E.L. has helped hundreds of candidates "ACE" their respective entrance exam and the oral board interview. Learn More...


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Comments & Responses

4 Responses so far.

  1. Name says:

    Worst department is NYPD. Read the news. The department treats its officer like crap. Bosses with no street time or arrests. Not enough time off. Cops use to tell friends to take this job. Now none do. The classes that have been coming on now are people you cant trust.

  2. tim says:

    I agree morale in the nypd is very low. The bosses now have very little experience and the dept treats criminals better than you. There is better places to be.

  3. Chris says:

    My dad was in the NYPD for 20 years. Pre and post 9/11. From what I have experienced as a family member of an New York City Police Officer I can easily say that the NYPD cares about their employees. Not to mention the fact that my dad earned a very high salary as a street level cop. That was in the early 2000′s, I don’t know about now. But I’m skeptical about how much could have really changed. The NYPD has always been about their employees and their families especially. Always had christmas and holidays at the precinct.

  4. Top Dog says:

    Now-a-days the police department is ran like a business. Stay in a parking lot reading magazines, ignore crime and the criminals, try tonot be there as much as possible , and you will retire with a full pention without worrying about the political drama and internal affairs being up your ass.