New York State Police Officer Salary or PayScale

New York State (NYPD) police officer salary, payscale, wages, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014, 2015, 2016, 2017, 2018, 2019
The New York State Department of Labor predicts that the need for workers in protective service occupations in New York will grow by nearly 2 percent from 2008 through 2018. In police forces across the state, the salaries of officers differ due to their responsibilities and daily job duties. Within each police job description, variation in pay rates also exists according to officers’ experience.

Requirements for Police Officer Employment in NYS

The following are the requirements to become a police officer in New York State:

  • Must be a United States Citizen;
  • Must have a high school diploma or equivalent;
  • Must have a valid Driver’s License;
  • Must successfully complete all phases of the hiring process to be considered for employment.
  • Must be at least 21 years old.

Watch the video below on the salary range of a police officer:

Salary Of a Parking Enforcement Officers In New York

Parking enforcement officers received the lowest rates of pay of all police officers in New York as of 2010, reports the NYSDL. Starting salaries for paring enforcement workers averaged $25,140 annually, while wages for the most experienced in the field averaged $41,830. The need for parking enforcement officers in New York will decrease by nearly 7 percent from 2008 through 2018, resulting in the elimination of around 40 jobs during that time frame.

Police Patrol Officers/Deputy Sheriff

Police officers who patrol New York on foot, horseback or motorcycle or by car received average annual wages of $60,940 as of 2010, estimates NYSDL. More than 54,000 New Yorkers worked as patrol officers, making it the largest field for police workers in the state at the time.

Entry-level patrol officers in New York earned an average of $40,590 per year, while those with the most experience averaged $71,110. The demand for police officers in New York was predicted to increase by roughly 3 percent from 2008 through 2018, creating more than 1,500 new jobs.

Detectives

The 9,200 detective working in New York in 2010 enjoyed the highest average annual salary among police officers who were not supervisors, according to the NYSDOL. Salaries for detectives in the state averaged $69,390 per year. Upon entering the field, New York detectives received a yearly average of $43,120, while the most experienced brought home salaries that averaged $82,520 annually. Predicted to grow by more than 4 percent from 2008 through 2018, the occupation of detective was the fastest-growing police-related job in New York state.

Sergeants/Supervisors

Sergeants of an entire shift and detectives in New York received an average of $90,060 per year, making them the highest-paid police officers statewide as of 2010, explains the NYSDL. Salaries for supervisors averaged $65,470 at the entry level. Those with the most experience managing police officers made a yearly average of $102,360. Job growth for management in police stations was predicted to increase by nearly 2 percent from 2008 through 2018, creating around 210 new positions across New York.

Benefits

The benefits that police officers are eligible for include paid vacation, sick leave and medical and life insurance. NYS police officers also get paid for overtime. This can bring a significant to boost to their earnings, as overtime is often plentiful.

Some officers will also receive an allowance for their uniforms. Guaranteed pensions are another benefit to police officers. The Bureau of Labor Statistics reports that many police officers are able to retire after just 25 or 30 years of service at half of their annual pay.
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Airmont
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Florida Armed Security Guard Requirements, Training, Classes

Florida requires security officers who work in armed security to possess a Class G firearms license.

Requirements for the license are established through the Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services’ division of licensing. To take firearms training in Florida, candidates must be at least 21-years-old.

Florida Law/Requirements To Become a Security Guard

According to Chapter 493 of the Florida Statutes, armed officers must complete 28 hours of training from a Class K-licensed firearms instructor. Training is generally two days of 10-hour classes and one, eight-hour day on the firing range.

Firearm safety and maintenance, civil liability and use of force, and analysis of Statute 775 (registration of criminals) and 790 (weapons and firearms) are included in classroom training.

Gun range training includes handgun marksmanship. After the classroom portion of training, guards must complete a comprehensive exam over the lessons. To qualify on the shotgun, officers must successfully fire 24 rounds of ammunition.

Salary Comparison Armed/Unarmed

Security officers with Class G firearms training earn more than Class D, unarmed officers. As of November 2010, armed officers in Florida earn $10 to $14 an hour, whereas unarmed officers earned $8 to $11 per hour.

Fees/Cost for Class G Training

As of November 2010, several private companies offered Class G training which cost about $200

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Collier Manor-Cresthaven
Conway
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Deltona
Destin
Doctor Phillips
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East Lake
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Washington County

Unarmed Security Officer Job Requirements in Florida

To become an unarmed security guard in the state of Florida, you will first need to obtain your Class “D” Security Guard License.

Licensing is overseen by the The Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services, Division of Licensing. Before you can apply, you must:

  • Be at least 18 years old.
  • Be a citizen or legal resident alien of the U.S. or have been granted authority to work in the U.S. by the Department of Homeland Security, U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS)
  • Complete the required security guard training.

Training Needed To Become A Security Guard In FL

Before you can apply, you must first complete a minimum of 40 hours of professional training by a Security Officer School or Training Facility licensed by the Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services.

The training may be obtained by one of the following methods:

  • Successful completion of 40 hours of training before you submit your initial application, or
  • Successful completion of 24 hours of training before you submit your initial application and successful completion of 16 hours of training within 180 days of the date your application was submitted to the Division of Licensing.

Florida Application Process

 

  • Proof of training.
  • A passport style photograph.
  • A legible set of fingerprints on a fingerprint card provided by the Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services.
  • Fees

License Fees/Cost

 

There is a $45 licensing fee, as well as a $42 fingerprint car processing fee. They can only be paid by money order, cashier’s check or a company check payable to the Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services.

 

More About The Employment Application Process

 

An application, which includes more detailed information about how to apply and what to include with your application, can be downloaded for free from the Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services website.

Click here to get access to your application, and remember that for an unarmed security guard, you will be going for a Class “D” Security Officer License.

Salary for Security Guards Working In Schools, Hotels, Hospital & Privately Owned Companies

 

  • The type of employer has an effect on security guards’ salaries. Security guards working at hospitals earned a median salary of $29,020, while security guards working in schools earned a salary of $27,980. Those working in local government earned $27,660, those working in hotels and motels earned $25,660, and those working for security service firms earned $22,170.

 

Average Annual Salary By State

 

  • Different states reflect different salaries for security guards. As of May 2009, the Bureau of Labor Statistics lists the mean annual salary of a security guard in Alaska as $37,020, in Florida as $23,000, in Hawaii as $26,240, in Nevada as $27,420, in New York as $28,280, and as $30,840 in Vermont.

 

Employment Outlook

 

  • The Bureau of Labor Statistics projects that security guard positions will grow rapidly over the next few years, close to 14 percent between 2008 and 2018. The main reasons for this growth are the continuing trend for increased security at all types of public events, and security guards taking over security roles formerly performed by local police officers.


Alachua
Altamonte Springs
Andover
Apollo Beach
Apopka
Arcadia
Atlantic Beach
Auburndale
Aventura
Avon Park
Azalea Park
Bartow
Bayonet Point
Bayshore Gardens
Beacon Square
Bee Ridge
Bellair-Meadowbrook Terrace
Belle Glade
Bellview
Beverly Hills
Bloomingdale
Boca Del Mar
Boca Raton
Bonita Springs
Boynton Beach
Bradenton
Brandon
Brent
Broadview Park
Brooksville
Brownsville
Callaway
Cape Canaveral
Cape Coral
Carol City
Casselberry
Century Village
Cheval
Citrus Park
Citrus Ridge
Clearwater
Clermont
Clewiston
Cocoa
Cocoa Beach
Coconut Creek
Collier Manor-Cresthaven
Conway
Cooper City
Coral Gables
Coral Springs
Coral Terrace
Country Club
Country Walk
Crestview
Cutler
Cutler Ridge
Cypress Gardens
Cypress Lake
Dade City
Dania Beach
Davie
Daytona Beach
De Bary
De Land
Deerfield Beach
Delray Beach
Deltona
Destin
Doctor Phillips
Doral
Dunedin
East Lake
East Perrine
Edgewater
Eglin AFB
Egypt Lake-Leto
Elfers
Englewood
Ensley
Estero
Eustis
Fairview Shores
Fern Park
Fernandina Beach
Ferry Pass
Florida City
Florida Ridge
Forest City
Fort Lauderdale
Fort Myers
Fort Myers Beach
Fort Pierce
Fort Pierce North
Fort Walton Beach
Fountainbleau
Fruit Cove
Fruitville
Gainesville
Gibsonton
Gifford
Gladeview
Glenvar Heights
Golden Gate
Golden Glades
Golden Lakes
Goldenrod
Gonzalez
Goulds
Greater Carrollwood
Greater Northdale
Greater Sun Center
Greenacres
Gulf Gate Estates
Gulfport
Haines City
Hallandale
Hamptons at Boca Raton
Hernando
Hialeah
Hialeah Gardens
Hobe Sound
Holiday
Holly Hill
Hollywood
Homestead
Homosassa Springs
Hudson
Hunters Creek
Immokalee
Indian Harbour Beach
Inverness
Inwood
Iona
Islamorada
Ives Estates
Jacksonville
Jacksonville Beach
Jasmine Estates
Jensen Beach
Jupiter
Kendale Lakes
Kendall
Kendall West
Key Biscayne
Key Largo
Key West
Keystone
Kings Point
Kissimmee
Lady Lake
Lake Butter
Lake City
Lake Lorraine
Lake Lucerne
Lake Magdalene
Lake Mary
Lake Park
Lake Wales
Lake Worth
Lake Worth Corridor
Lakeland
Lakeland Highlands
Lakes by the Bay
Lakeside
Lakewood Park
Land O’ Lakes
Lantana
Largo
Lauderdale Lakes
Lauderhill
Laurel
Leesburg
Lehigh Acres
Leisure City
Lighthouse Point
Live Oak
Lockhart
Longboat Key
Longwood
Lutz
Lynn Haven
Maitland
Mango
Marathon
Marco Island
Margate
Marianna
McGregor
Meadow Woods
Medulla
Melbourne
Melrose Park
Memphis
Merritt Island
Miami
Miami Beach
Miami Lakes
Miami Shores
Miami Springs
Micco
Middleburg
Milton
Mims
Miramar
Mount Dora
Myrtle Grove
Naples
Naples Park
Neptune Beach
New Port Richey
New Port Richey East
New Smyrna Beach
Niceville
Norland
North Andrews Gardens
North Bay Village
North Fort Myers
North Lauderdale
North Miami
North Miami Beach
North Palm Beach
North Port
North Sarasota
Oak Ridge
Oakland Park
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What Do I Need to Become a Police Officer How To Become a Cop?

With the economy in shambles, many people are leaving the private sector in favor of the security provided in government jobs. Law enforcement jobs are one of the few careers that can sustain an economic downturn. Police departments are usually hiring, while everybody else are laying off.

Deciding that police work is what you want to do for the rest of your life can be very excitement. However the process to eventually wear that badge is a long and tedious one. Sometimes taking as long as a year or two before you are hired. The application process is not easy, but the rewards are enormous.

Take it from me, being a police officer is one of the few careers that you’ll have an oppurtunity to make a difference on a daily basis. Sure there are other notable careers like teachers and doctors, but there’s nothing more noble than public service.

Image saving a young mother’s life from an abusive husband – had you not shown up would have gotten killed, or helping a young kid see the light, directly shifting the destination of their young life.  That’s impact at its finest.

Becoming a police officer has its rewards like great pay, paid vacations, career advancement oppurtunities, retirement program, not to mention the lucrative off duty assignments.  Off duty details depending on the city can greatly supplement an officer’s yearly earnings.

That’s why many police officers around the country are making a lot of money, some even reach the six figure mark in some cities. The reason are, private companies  are willing to pay big bucks to hire police officers.

Requirements To become a police officer:

  • You must be at least 21 years of age in most states
  • You must not have been convicted of a felony
  • You must pass the police written exam (also known as the civil service exam in some states)
  • You must pass the background check
  • You must have a high school diploma or GED (some PD’s require some college or military experience)
  • You must pass the physical ability test  (physical fitness test)
  • You must possess good moral character and reputation
  • You must have a valid driver’s license
  • You must not have been convicted of domestic violence
  • You must pass the medical exam
  • You must pass the psychological test
  • You must pass the polygraph test
  • You must not have a poor credit history

While the life of a police officer may seem exciting to some, there are some con’s to consider. For example, police officers have a high divorce rate.

Police officer are usually stressed out to the max, and face a lot of risky situations on a daily basis. Police officer are usually the ones running into a building with an armed gunmen inside, while everyone else are running out of the building.

Average Salary, Pay Scale & Pay Range of a Law Enforcement Officer

If you are looking for a law enforcement job – the biggest questions on your mind is probably, “How much money does a law enforcement officer make per year?” The answer varies base on geographic location, what law enforcement entity you are looking to get into and etc.

However looking into the average  salary for a law enforcement officer is a very interesting topic because there are several variables that affect a LEO’s yearly earnings.

Before giving you a raw number on how much you’ll earn as a law enforcement officer, let’s break down the many components inside the law enforcement profession. First and foremost, the term law enforcement can mean many things as there are several different branches.

For instance, do you want to work at the local, state, or federal level? The second questions is are you looking to get into police work, Corrections, DEA, FBI, US Marshall? These questions will directly impact how much money you make.

The higest paid entry level jobs in the law enforcement profession is with the federal government.  However as you know, not everyone can work for the federal government as their hiring process is extremely competitive, and intense. It’s not uncommon to see thousands of applicants for a handful of openings.

So what is the average salary, pay scale, pay chart of a law enforcement officer?

How Much Does a Cop Make?

Again it all depends on what you want to do. For example, if you want to work as a police officer for the state, county, or the city expect a salary between $30,000 to $45,000 starting out.  Of course the salary will gradually increase as you gain more experience, but the entry level, straight out of the academy will be around 45k abd below.

The pay is a lot higher in bigger cities like Los Angeles, Chicago, and New York. Why? Because the cost of living there is higher.

How much does a correctional officer make?

The highest paying industries for correctional officers are the federal government, with pays $52,310; state government, at $43,710; and local government, at $41,370.

Both state and local governments also offer the best employment opportunities, at 256,880 and 160,310 jobs, respectively. They are followed by facilities support services, with pay at $31,870 and employment at 21,610.

How Much Does An Fbi Agent Make?

FBI agents use the same base pay tables that govern salaries for all government workers. These tables divide pay into grades, which relate to education and experience. Each grade is further divided into 10 steps to account for salary increases between grades.

New agents start at grade GS-10, step 1, which pays $45,771 per year as of January 2011. A mid-level agent might be classified under GS-12, step 6, with compensation at $70,319. The highest GS-15, step 10 level on this table makes $129,517 per year.

If you are searching for truck driver jobs the biggest question on your mind is probably, “How much money do truck drivers make?” This is a very interesting and exciting topic as we will go through the things that effect truck driver income and give you realistic salary values.

How Much Does a DEA Agent Get Paid?

Starting salaries for DEA special agents as of September, 2010, are about $49,746 per year for GS-7 salary level agents and $55,483 per year for GS-9 salary level agents. GS levels are used by the OPM to determine pay levels for federal employees.

After working for the DEA for four years, the salary of special agents can progress to GS-13 level which is set at about $92,592 or more per year (as of September, 2010).

How Much Money Does a Secret Service Agent Make Per Year?

A secret service agent’s base salary is $43,200 – $73,354. A lump sum of 25 percent of one year’s salary granted to those who pass the foreign language exam. Further bonuses relating to foreign language are determined by the availability of funds and use of the language in the field.

After five years of service, the median salary for an agent increases significantly to a median salary of $90,733. Median pay is $95,000 after ten years.

San Diego Police Department Employment/Recruiting Process

San Diego Police Department application Process PD 2017, 2018, 2019, 2020, 2021, 2022, 2023, 2024,2025
Want to become a police officer for the San Diego Police Department? Do you even know what the hiring process looks like. If you don’t know what’s required of you before applying to SDPD, read this article through and through.

Truth is, the employment process to become a police officer for San Diego PD is a long and tedious one.  Sometimes taking as long as a year before you are hired.  Although the hiring process  can drag on, San Diego PD is a great agency to work for.

Not only will  SDPD provide top-notch training to fellow recruits before they hit the streets, they also offer great benefits,  a very competitive  salary range, and a superb retirement package.

WATCH THE VIDEO TO LEARN MORE ABOUT SDPD RECRUITING PROCESS:

Steps of The Hiring/Recruiting Process

There are several steps to the hiring process listed below. Click on the links to learn more about the various steps.

 Step 1: Written Exam
 Step 2: Physical Abilities Test and Pre-Investigative Questionnaire
View dates and time of Practice Physical Abilities Test
 Step 3: Background Process and “Personal History Statement” (Word  PDF). The Personal History Statement will not be completed until after the successful completion of the Physical Abilities Test.
 Step 4: Polygraph Examination
 Step 5: Hiring Interview
 Step 6: Psychological Evaluation
 Step 7: Medical Evaluation

Police Recruit Background Investigation/Interview

Background Investigation

The Police Department will conduct a thorough investigation of your background. You will be requested to authorize organizations and individuals who know you, to release and verify relevant information about you. The Background Investigator will contact prior employers, relatives, and references. Information provided during these contacts may result in other individuals being contacted. The investigator will check into your employment history, credit status, driving record, and other pertinent information. A criminal history check will also be made. Next, you will be scheduled for an in-depth background interview with the Police Department Investigator. During this appointment, you will be fingerprinted.

Polygraph Examination

As part of the background process, the Background Detective will schedule you for a polygraph examination. You will be tested in 15 different background areas called “Job Dimensions.” In addition, you will be asked to determine if you were honest with the background detective, truthful on your application, undetected criminal involvement, traffic history, illicit drug use, illegal gambling habits, and any other pertinent information discovered or revealed during the background investigation, including employment and military history.

Appointing Authority Interview

Viable candidates will be scheduled for an appointing authority interview with the San Diego Police Department. Your qualifications, communication skills, and many other job related factors would be evaluated relating to your suitability and fitness to begin a police career with the San Diego Police Department.

Personal History Statement

A “Personal History Statement” (Word  PDF) is required as part of the background investigation. The form may be downloaded or a hardcopy will be provided the day of the Physical Abilities Test. The Personal History Statement will not be completed until after the successful completion of the Physical Abilities Test.

Requirements & Qualifications

You must meet the following requirements on the date you apply, unless otherwise indicated.
GENERAL:  United States citizen or permanent resident alien who is eligible and has applied for United States citizenship PRIOR to application for employment.
AGE:  21 years at time of hire.
EXPERIENCE:  Two years of full-time paid experience as a sworn peace officer with a city police, county sheriff, state or federal law enforcement agency performing correction duties, patrol functions, or traffic enforcement.  Experience must include service with a law enforcement agency within the last one year.  Time served in a training capacity as a recruit/trainee as part of a Police Academy does NOT qualify for the experience requirement.
EDUCATION:  Satisfactory completion of a minimum of 30 semester or 45 quarter college units at time of application.  You must also meet ONE of the following options: 
1.   Graduation from a high school located within the United States or a United States territory.
2.   Passage of the California High School Proficiency Examination or G.E.D. (General Education Development) with scores that meet the California standard established by the American Council on Education.
3.   Possession of a two or four year degree from an accredited college or university. (Accreditation must be from an institutional accrediting body which has been recognized by the Council on Postsecondary Accreditation.)
NOTES:
·         Applicants who lack the required college units may substitute additional qualifying experience for some or all of the education lacked, according to the following formula: 2.5 semester units or 3.75 quarter units = 1 month of experience.
·         Candidates screened by the Police Department must present proof of education when they submit their Background Investigation Questionnaire.
POST CERTIFICATE:  You must meet ONE of the following options:
1.   Graduation from a California P.O.S.T. approved Police Academy with a Basic Peace Officers Course Certificate.
2.   Possession of a California Basic P.O.S.T. Certificate.
3.   Completion of the California P.O.S.T. Basic Course Waiver Evaluation
NOTE:
·         Qualified out-of-state applicants who lack the required California P.O.S.T. Certificate may apply.  If hired, attendance at PAID Police Academy will be required to satisfy California state certification requirements.  This certification is necessary to work as a Police Officer for the City of San Diego.
TYPING CERTIFICATE:  An ORIGINAL typing certificate indicating the ability to type at a corrected speed of 30 words per minute on a typewriter or computer keyboard must be submitted during the Police Department’s Background Investigation Process.   The certificate must be issued under International Typing Contest Rules and specify the net and gross speed, the number of errors and that the test was five minutes or longer.  Certificates specifying more than five errors will not be accepted.  Individuals who are serving or have served in City of San Diego job classifications which meet or exceed the minimum typing requirements need not submit a typing certificate.  Internet typing tests will not be accepted.
LICENSE: A valid California Class C Driver License is required at time of hire.

San Diego PD Police Recruit Physical Abilities Test (PAT)

For this test, candidates will be required to run a 500 yard obstacle course which measures a wide range of physical abilities that are necessary in police work. This course, which simulates a suspect chase, will require you to dodge low hanging objects; climb ladders and stairs; run through a series of pylons; jump, step and/or climb over a 3 foot, 4 foot, and 6 foot fence; and partially lift and drag a 155 pound “simulated victim.” You will be provided a vest which weighs approximately 3 pounds and must be worn while performing this test. Shorts or loose fitting clothes that do not restrict arm and leg movements are suggested as appropriate clothing. Footwear should be some type of comfortable athletic shoe with a gripping rubber sole.

SDPD Average Salary, Pay Scale, Pay Chart, Pay Range

Class Title: Police Officer I
Class Code: 1692
Salary: $23.68 – $28.59 Hourly
$1,894.40 – $2,287.20 Biweekly
$49,254.40 – $59,467.20 Annually
Class Title: Police Officer II
Class Code: 1693
Salary: $30.21 – $36.51 Hourly
$2,416.80 – $2,920.80 Biweekly
$62,836.80 – $75,940.80 Annually
Class Title: Police Officer III
Class Code: 1695
Salary: $31.73 – $38.34 Hourly
$2,538.40 – $3,067.20 Biweekly
$65,998.40 – $79,747.20 Annually

 

Secrets To a Successful Law Enforcement Career – 4 Rules To Follow

4 Important Rules For Future Police Officers

By Captain Ron Orso 

 This article is for anyone who wants to be a cop,  is in an academy or FTO Program, or who already is a cop.  It’s based upon 25 years of mistakes, missteps,  and just plain dumb luck.

 A truly great street cop who once worked for me for 7 years, Joe G., (and who is responsible for every gray hair on my head),  once pointed out to me (actually it was about once an hour),  my alleged shortcomings as far as police work was concerned. He often said that I couldn’t find a collar on a shirt.

It was due to him that I began to  review certain important rules of policing.  These weren’t tactical rules so much as they were rules of dealing with people, both those who worked with me as well as those I would deal with as “clients” on the job.  The following are my 4 rules.  I hope that they may help you avoid a number of screw ups that I brought upon myself.

#1.  FAMILY COMES 1st.   You must remember that you can still give 150% to the job, can be a robo-cop and lock up every crook in thepolice officer and family, cops and kids, law enforcement and family tips and advice world,  but if things aren’t peaceful on the home front,  you’ll never be able to give your all, or even your best to yourself and your agency.

The job, while it can be a fantastic life, and you may be able to do great good, is ultimately still a tool.  It’s a means to an ends.

It’s a way of providing for you and yours.  The reason why so many cops are on their 3rd and 4th marriages as well as drinking themselves into suspensions and ruined careers stems from not following this rule.

Now the very nature of the job means you’re going to miss dinners, birthdays, etc.  That’s not my point,  all I mean that your priorities are in order as far as God & family are concerned.

 #2.  NEVER LIE OR PERJURE YOURSELF.   Now there is a difference between telling a lie (a non-truth) to a mutt to get information, and all other situations.

Telling lies to the bad guys is a time honored cop trait, so I’m not speaking about that situation; although it can be argued that even that is wrong. I’m describing telling lies in all other situations, to your husband, wife, child, parent and especially ANYTHING that has to do with your official duties.

Aside from it being morally wrong,  a cop is only as good as their word.  Screw up once, and even if you don’t get fired and lose your pension (or worse),  your career is sunk because you’ll be useless as a witness, either on paper or in court. You may as well hang up your badge & gun and start selling pickles at flea markets.  This goes not only orally, as in interviews, reports to higher ups, and in court, but especially in every and all documents you sign your name to submit.

#3.  NEVER MISS THE OPPORTUNITY TO DO A GOOD DEED.   Yes, I know that a lot of us went into, or are going into the job because we want to help people and / or make a difference.  For those of you who follow the Judeo-Christian faiths, the “do unto others” or the “golden rule”, or “”What is hateful to yourself do not do to your fellow man “ applies.

For those of you who follow a strictly scientific bend it’s “for every action there is an equal & opposite reaction.”  Any followers of Eastern religions can call it positive Karma.  Whatever, it’s the chance to make someone’s life a tad better, and it is the basis of police work, so be aware of every opportunity to apply it in ever call you take.  MAKE A POSITIVE DIFFERENCE.

 #4.  NEVER STOP LEARNING.  Just like a shark that dies if it ever stops swimming (even in its sleep), any cop who stops learning will die, and usually in a very unpleasant manner.

No matter how smart you think you are, or how much experience you have on the job, there will always be a bad guy (or girl), out there who knows more,  and when you meet up with them, you’re going down unless you’re very lucky.  To paraphrase General Patton, it’s not you job to die, it’s your job to make the bad guy die if it’s the only choice.

 Joe G. used to think that I was very intelligent, but not so smart.  I hate to admit it, but until I started applying these 4 rules, he was more correct than I’d like to admit.

 God bless & stay safe.

Ron Orso is a retired Police Captain from the Borough of Fort Lee, NJ Police.  He holds a B.A. In History, and a Masters in Public Administration.  He was a police officer for 25 years, is married with 2 sons, and has 22 years experience in Emergency Management.  He’s also a Disabled Veteran.

How Much Money Does a Police Officer Make

Based upon where you are working as a policemen, his/her salary can be very different. Senior police officers, for instance, make much more than a rookie police officer who is enrolled in the law enforcement training academy.

Detectives on the other hand, ca often make more than patrol officers. If you are in a specialized team like  undercover, SWAT or other specialized units you’ll probably be amongst the highest paid employees in the department.
how much money does a police officer make per year, salary, pay scale, pay chart, 2017, 2018, 2019, 2020, 2021, 2022, 2023, 2024
All and all the income of a police officer per week depends on several factors like…

  • The size of the city/town/county (location)
  • Size of the police department
  • Average income of residents in the city/town/county
  • Career advancement opportunities at that particular agency

These four things are closely linked to how much a police officer can make per year. However the base pay of a police officer on paper is not the end all be all as police officers have opportunities to supplement their income through off duty employment.

Watch the video below to learn the average salary of a police officer:

Job Description And Responsibilities Of a Policemen:

As you know the main responsibility of a police officer is to protect and serve the community in which they live in. They are there to investigate crime, respond to suspicious activity, and many more such as…

  • Report timely to locations of criminal incidents. Conduct checking, collect proofs, arrest suspects based on specific legislation.
  • Patrolling (on foot/car/bikes) to ensure no criminal activities are going on in localities.
  • Assist public in response to requests regarding domestic violence, child abuse, theft, robbery and other criminal activities.
  • Cooperate with traffic police in cases related to road accidents.
  • Conducting arrests in regards to cases related to violation of human rights, security and peace of an area.
  • Perform criminal backgrounds checks.
  • Conduct awareness programs for community security and reducing crimes.
  • Preparing crime reports and presenting progress of any case to senior officers.
  • Attending and helping courts/lawyers in solving criminal matters.
  • Interview alleged person who is supposed to be a culprit of any criminal activity.

How Much Money Does a Cop Make Per Year: Average Salary & Pay Scale

As I explained above the amount of money a police officer makes is based largely upon his or her experience, location, or whether or not he/she works in a specialized unit. On average, a typical cop can expect to make about $40,000 to $50,000 per year. The pay will increase after your first year, and keep increasing as you gain more experience.

If you interview for a specialized position or work your way into supervison like a sergeant and lieutant, your yearly earnings will peak to around $70,000 or higher in most cities.

Remember those numbers does not reflect every agency as it defers from department to department. Those recruits who are fresh out of the academy will make a little less than seasoned officers who have been on the job longer.

Click on your state below to learn the avearge salary of a police officer in your area:

 

State State
Alabama AL Montana MT
Alaska AK Nebraska NE
Arizona AZ Nevada NV
Arkansas AR New Hampshire NH
California CA New Jersey NJ
Colorado CO New Mexico NM
Connecticut CT New York NY
Delaware DE North Carolina NC
Florida FL North Dakota ND
Georgia GA Ohio OH
Hawaii HI Oklahoma OK
Idaho ID Oregon OR
Illinois IL Pennsylvania PA
Indiana IN Rhode Island RI
Iowa IA South Carolina SC
Kansas KS South Dakota SD
Kentucky KY Tennessee TN
Louisiana LA Texas TX
Maine ME Utah UT
Maryland MD Vermont VT
Massachusetts MA Virginia VA
Michigan MI Washington WA
Minnesota MN West Virginia WV
Mississippi MS Wisconsin WI
Missouri MO Wyoming WY

 

Phoenix Police Department Selection/Recruitment Process

Watch The Video For an Important Message From PHX PD Commander Chris Crockett:

If you are looking for information on the Phoenix Police Department hiring process you’ve landed on the right webpage. However you must understand that the application process is quite detailed and lengthy.

The truth is the recruitment process is a long and tedious one. Sometimes taking up to a year before you are hired. Honestly that is pretty standard for law enforcement agencies across the country.

Below is the steps that you’ll have to successfully complete before you are hired by PPD:

The following are 7 steps to help you get started with a career in the Phoenix Police Department 

STEP 1 The Written Test
No written test are scheduled at this time.

Applicants will not be admitted without a photo ID.

STEP 2 Physical Agility Test
Offered only to those who successfully pass the written test,
and will be administered at the Phoenix Law Enforcement Academy.
Click here for physical agility chart

STEP 3 Background Questionnaire Investigation
The AZPOST background packet is given to those who successfully complete both the written and agility exams.
The packet must be completed by the applicant and returned to the Employment Services Bureau for review.

620 West Washington St.
Phoenix, AZ 85003

Qualified applicants are contacted a short time later (1-3 weeks) for initial interview.
Click here for minimum qualifications

STEP 4 Polygraph Examination
Applicants will be given a polygraph examination (lie detector test) administered by a trained, professional examiner. The test will confirm information noted on the applicant’s background investigation packet.

STEP 5 Psychological Test
Applicants will be evaluated by a licensed psychologist.

STEP 6 Medical Examination
Applicants will undergo a complete medical examination given by a licensed physician.

STEP 7 Controlled Substance Screening
Applicants will be required to submit to a urinalysis at some point in the hiring process.

Average Salary, Pay scale, Earnings & Benefits

Police Officer Salary and Benefits
Information Provided by the Police Department
Starting Salary Top Salary
Annual $51,484.00 Annual $72,428
Monthly Monthly
Biweekly Biweekly
Hourly $24.75 Hourly $34.82

Salary while in the Academy

Police Recruit (Salary During the 18 week Academy)
Hourly (Recruit) $21.45 ($44,616-Annual)
Monthly

After Graduating the Academy

Annual $24.75 ($51,484)

After Six Months

Annual $26.19 ($54,476)

After 18 months

Annual $27.74 ($57,705)

Benefits

Career Enhancement Pay
(Exclusive to the Phoenix Police Department)

C.E.P. is a 4 tiered bonus pay program that is based on an accumulation of points derived from credit hours, college degrees, training hours, physical fitness level, firearms proficiency, training certifications, specialty assignments and other additional skills.

 

Level 1 (30 points) $158.60 Per Month $1,903.20 Per Year
Level 2 (50 points) $317.20 Per Month $3,806.40 Per Year
Level 3 (70 points) $475.80 Per Month $5,709.60 Per Year
Level 4 (90 points) $634.40 Per Month $7,612.80 Per year

Bilingual Incentive Pay

$10 an hour in addition to regular hourly pay while engaged in translation activities. This includes all related paperwork, investigation time and court appearances.

Longevity Performance Pay

After 7 years of service, employees receive $80.00 semi-annually for each year of service in excess of 6 years to a maximum of $2,240 per year at 20 years of service.

Employees with 20+ years of service receive $125 semi-annually for each year of service up to a maximum of $4000 per year at 22 years.

Education/Tuition Reimbursement

Currently $3,974 in reimbursement funds is available every year to pay for tuition, books, and lab fees. Must attend an accredited college or university in a related field of study.

Nightshift/Weekend Differential Pay

60 cents an hour in addition to hourly pay when working a shift which ends after 10:00pm.
25 cents an hour in addition to hourly pay when working a weekend shift.

Compensatory Time Bank Option

Officers can continuously store up to 200 hours of overtime in their comp bank and have the option to cash out any hours in their comp bank at any time or may use any hours in their comp bank to take time off.

Paid Court Overtime

Court appearances at a time other than the regular scheduled duty time is compensated at a rate of one and one-half (1 ½) times the officer’s regular hourly rate of pay with a minimum 3 hours court time paid for each court appearance.

Court standby at a time other than the regular scheduled duty time pay is compensated at a rate of one and one-half (1 ½) times the officer’s regular hourly rate of pay with a minimum 2 hours per day while an officer is on standby.

Department Provided Equipment

The Phoenix Police Department provides its officers with their firearm, gun-belt (including equipment carriers such as holster, magazine carrier, etc.) , handcuffs, ammunition, pepper spray, breast badge, flat badge, traffic vest, helmet, fingerprint kit, puncture resistant gloves, tape recorder.

Uniform Allowance

Employees receive $1,150.00 per year for the purchase of uniforms and any additional equipment. Detectives and specialty assignments receive an additional $320.00 depending on assignment.

Ballistic Vest Allowance

Officers receive $800.00 to purchase their initial vest and every 5 years to purchase a replacement vest in addition to the annual uniform allowance.

4/10 Hour Work Schedule

Patrol officers work 4 days a week for 10 hours each shift. Officers are given a 30 minute paid lunch break and a 15 minute paid break, which may be combined to a 45 minute paid lunch break during each shift.

Vacation Leave

1 to 5 Years of Service – 8 Hours Per Month = 96 Hours Per Year
6 to 10 Years of Service – 10 Hours Per Month = 120 Hours Per Year
11 to 15 Years of Service – 11 Hours Per Month = 132 Hours Per Year
16 to 20 Years of Service – 13 Hours Per Month = 152 Hours Per Year
21 Years or More – 15 Hours Per Month = 180 Hours Per Year

Personal Leave

20 hours of personal leave time each year.

Holiday Pay

10 paid holidays each year. If an officer’s duty day is on a holiday, the officer will receive an additional 8 hours of pay for the day if it is worked.

Training Reimbursement

Officers have the option to use up to $500 of their tuition reimbursement funds to attend training schools, seminars and classes that are not affiliated with an academic institution.

Health Insurance

Individual – $40.61 twice monthly (includes eyes and prescriptions)
Family – $117.02 twice monthly

Dental (individual) No cost to employee
Dental (family) $37.72 deducted monthly

Life Insurance

$200,000 in commuter life insurance is provided by the City of Phoenix.
This coverage includes the period 2 hours prior to and 2 hours after your
work shift. Up to $250,000 in optional supplemental life insurance is available.

Deferred Compensation Plan

Optional secondary retirement system 401(a) plan in which employees invest a portion of their pay in various stocks and/or mutual funds chosen by the employee. The city contributes one and one eighteenth percent (2.18%) of the employee’s monthly gross pay into the account of the employee’s choosing.

Retirement Plan

50 percent of average annual gross pay per year for service in excess of 20 years (including overtime).
Increases 2 percent up to 25 years of service. Increases 2 1/2 percent from 25 years of service to 32 years of service. 80 percent of average annual pay per year for service in excess of 32 years. (annual pay is based on the average pay for three highest consecutive years of service). Retirement Fund withholdings are not taxed which results in a 2 to 3.5 % increase in take home pay.

Requirements & Qualifications

  • Be at least 20 years of age at the time of application, 21 years of age prior to completion of the Academy.
  • Be a United States Citizen.
  • Be in sound physical and mental health.
  • Have at least 20/20 vision uncorrected; or 20/20 vision corrected by glasses or hard contact lenses if uncorrected acuity is 20/80 or better; 20/20 vision corrected by soft contact lenses if uncorrected acuity is 20/200 or better. Vision capable of distinguishing basic color groups against a favorable background.
  • Have not been dishonorably discharged from the United States Armed Forces.
  • Within the last 36 months:
    • Have fewer than 8 driving violations points,
    • No more than one chargeable accident,
    • No conviction for DUI (One Lifetime)
    • Driver’s license that is cancelled, refused, suspended or revoked.
  • Must meet AZ P.O.S.T. and Phoenix Police Department drug standards.
  • No commission or conviction of a felony. Misdemeanor arrests are discretionary.
  • Must have good moral character and personal integrity.
  • No history of criminal or improper conduct. No poor employment or irresponsible financial history.
  • Must have a high school diploma or GED equivalency.
  • AZ POST (Arizona Peace Officers Standards and Training) certified officers may be eligible for lateral transfers after submitting an application and completing the physical agility exam and the Phoenix Police Department background investigation.

Field Training Officer Program (FTO)

Written by: Law Enforcement Contributors

So, you’ve either finished your academy, or you can see the light at the end of the tunnel (assuming it’s not an oncoming train.)  You may be thinking that you made it, you have the job and all of the good and bad that will come with it for the next 20 -30 years.

  Think again.  Having graduated your academy is merely the 1st step in what hopefully will be a long and rewarding career for you.  In most – not all agencies, you may be assigned to an FTO (Field Training Officer) program.  This is where you’ll be assigned to a series (ideally) of senior officers over different shifts to be trained in your agency’s internal procedures,  critical job tasks and actual street work.

 One of the country’s first, best, and well known FTO Programs is called “The San Jose” model.  The following paragraph was swiped directly from their website at:      http://www.sjpd.org/bfo/FieldTraining/home.html

Reason Behind The FTO Program:

 “The purpose of the Field Training and Evaluation Program (FTO) is to train new officers so that each is prepared to function as a solo beat officer at the conclusion of their training cycle.  The training cycle consists of 17 weeks of intensive on-the-job training and daily performance evaluations. Training is conducted and staffed by field training officers and sergeants on a 24-hour basis. “

 While the San Jose model is clearly one of the best, there are others.  Unfortunately they are as numerous as the law enforcement agencies that run them.  I wish I could tell you how your agency will run the program, assuming they have one, but obviously, I can’t.  The best thing you can  do is ask,  ahead of time.  I can, however, give you my own experience.  The following is the way not to do things.

First Hand Experience:

 When I first came on I was assigned to 1 partner.  Your 1st partner could normally last 2 years, and sometime during that time-usually after 12 months- your partner would write out a quick “3-liner” (a short narrative report, usually 1 or 2 paragraphs), that said “this guy -or girl- was capable of performing the duties of a police officer.”  Period.  No formal training, for you or your senior partner.  You basically just “shadowed” the guy and did what you were told, and if you did something wrong, you got a butt chewing and moved on.

 We rotated shifts every 7 days, and you followed your partner.  If he was off, the Sgt would stick you with whomever he was pissed off  with at the moment, and you got a “fresh” perspective. (Or as I was told by one guy who was bout to be made a Sgt., “you do anything to screw me up tonight, and you’d better go back to the Philippines or Korea, or wherever it was you served, ’cause that’s the only place in the world where I won’t be able to choke your chicken!”)

 This procedure was done this way because that’s the way it always was done, and you’ll learn that in most – not all – agencies, that’s why you do things that don’t make any sense.  Because that’s the way it’s always been done.  Cops hate change.

 Jump ahead 10 years and I was a Sgt. Working for a Lieutenant in Professional Standards and Training.  The Lt., was actually my 1st partner, and we were a team again. He was a smart guy who knew the way we were doing things was begging for a lawsuit and worse.

 We checked with a dozen other agencies and then went to a 5 day class on FTO Training using the San Jose model.  We spent 6 months creating a program and attempting to train senior officers.  That’s where we hit the 1st stumbling block.

 One of the basic ideas is that you don’t force senior officers to become the trainers.  You look for volunteers who want to do it, not have to do it.  You’re also supposed to throw them a “bone” for all of the extra work and responsibility that they have to be involved in.  We couldn’t give them any extra $$$ – my agency and town cried poverty for 25 years, even though they were one of the richest towns in the state, and contract negotiations would have had to be considered.  So we suggested non cash benefits such as 1st choice at elective training,  specific medals / stripes for the uniform, etc.

 No.

 Deputy Chief Tin-man (so called, because he was considered heartless, and whenever he entered a room someone banged a metal desk or chair), said he’d assign the trainers, and they’d do it without compensation, because some trained them, and it was their turn to train someone else.  The difference was that the FTO’s spent a good 30 minutes of paperwork extra per day, and after the time period was over, they’d be reassigned to do it again after 3  months.

 Rather than stay with 1 partner, we had the trainees switch partners every month, at the same time they’d go to a new shift with a new Sgt. and crew.  By this time we had steady shifts of 6 months in length.  Each trainer filled out a DOR (Daily Observation Report)  that contained 15 critical tasks rated between 1 – 7, with 1 being poor and 7 outstanding.  The recruit was reviewed daily.  In addition. Both the FTO and the recruit had a handbook explaining every detail of the program.  At the end of 3 months, they’d go back to their original partner and be tested on a series of critical job related tasks such as pursuit driving or firearm safety or use of force and a dozen other tasks.  The 3 FTO’s would then sit down with the FTO supervisor (me), and decide pass / fail / or recycle for another month.  At least that was the way it was supposed to be.

What actually happened was that since none of the FTO’s were volunteers, none of them really wanted to do it.  They especially didn’t want to do it when they saw the extra work involved.  The program was supposed to save time, a completed 13 week cycle instead of 12 months, and everything documented, both to show that the recruit was actually trained on  tested and passed  every critical task, and as part of due process (fundamental fairness) should the recruit bomb out even after re-training.  Tin-man insisted that the time period still be between 6 – 12 months, which meant the FTO’s were often doing it for a year without a break or bone, and even those who were actually trying to do the right thing were burned out after the first 6 months.  In addition, the Sgts. were ticked off because they got extra paperwork and had to utilize the FTO/recruit car as a 1 person car rather than a 2 person, which meant extra calls for everyone on the shift.  All this managed to do was piss off everyone on the shift.  All 3 shifts.

 I wish I could say that things gradually improved, but this went on for  years, no matter what my Lt and I tried to do.  I eventually got promoted and went on to other things, and as a Lt I tried my best to incorporate what I knew was the right thing as far as the program was concerned.  God only knows how long things would have stayed the same, until 9/11 hit us and suddenly someone upstairs (in the department, not the heavens),  decided that perhaps the way things were being done might not be so smart.  Someone could get hurt, or worse, sued.

 Things gradually improved, but by that time I was retired.  I hope your FTO experience is better.

 Stay safe & may God bless you & yours.