What Is The Juvenile Corrections Officer Exam

Questions on the youth corrections officer exam typically cover memory, situational reasoning, grammar, mathematics, reading comprehension, inmate security and decision making ability. Most exams are about three hours long and composed of 100 multiple-choice questions.

The majority of corrections officer exams are written exams, but some states/counties, not many though, require both written and video-based exams. Usually, the exams are scored on a scale of 100 points and most states require a minimum passing score of 70.

IMPORTANT NOTE: If you are looking for a comprehensive step-by-step study guide loaded with practice test questions click the link below:

CORRECTIONAL OFFICER STUDY GUIDE

 

PREREQUISITES FOR TAKING THE YOUTH DETENTION OFFICER EXAM

Before a prospective corrections officer can take the qualifying exam, he/she must have a minimum of a high school diploma or GED. Some states/counties also require prospective corrections officers to have completed a minimum number of college credits but often this requirement will be waived if the officer has previous law enforcement or civil service experience. Many exam applicants have graduated from a law enforcement academy. Though this is a requirement in some states/county, it is not mandatory in all states.

APPLYING TO TAKE THE JUVENILE CORRECTIONS OFFICER EXAM

Prospective corrections officers interested in taking the exam must first apply to do so at their state’s or county’s corrections agency. Some counties charge an application fee and ask applicants to provide information about their educational background, any law enforcement academy training, and previous professional law enforcement experience. Exams are offered several times during the year, so applicants are also asked to request an exam date. Applicants will need to consult their state’s/county’s law enforcement agency for the exam schedule.

WHAT HAPPENS AFTER TAKING THE JUVENILE CORRECTIONS OFFICER EXAM?

Most states/counties require a score of 70 or above to pass the corrections officer exam. A higher score on the exam will make an applicant more desirable to both private and state corrections agencies. After a prospective officer passes the exam and is hired, he or she typically enters into further job training and an entry-level position in a correctional facility. States/counties also have specific policies for candidates who fail their exam and wish to retake it. In some instances, prospective corrections officers are able to take only one exam per year.

PRACTICE TEST QUESTIONS & ANSWERS

As mentioned above, if you are looking for a corrections officer exam study guide loaded with sample test questions with detailed answers click the link below to learn more.

YOUTH CORRECTIONS OFFICER EXAM STUDY GUIDE

 

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Cook County Illinois Chicago
Harris County Texas Houston
Maricopa County Arizona Phoenix
San Diego County California San Diego
Orange County California Santa Ana
Kings County New York Brooklyn
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Miami-Dade County Florida Miami
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Riverside County California Riverside
San Bernardino County California San Bernardino
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Santa Clara County California San Jose
Broward County Florida Fort Lauderdale
Bexar County Texas San Antonio
New York County New York Manhattan
Philadelphia County Pennsylvania Philadelphia
Suffolk County New York Riverhead
Middlesex County Massachusett

Correctional Officer Physical Test

When you training for the corrections officer physical fitness test (also known as the physical abilities test), you must think in terms of body weight exercises instead of heavy weight training routines. The corrections officer fitness test consist of only three or four type of test that is designed to measure your physical readiness for the job.

There maybe other exercises but normally the test consist of pushups, sit-ups and running. The way you prepare for these exercises is implementing body weight exercises and interval training.

The sample body weight circuit below that I designed for the corrections officer fitness test don’t require any equipment. However if you want to add weights you can do so, but it is not necessary as you will get a great fat burning workout.

The bodyweight workout below should be done three times a week (e.i. M,W,F) followed by a 20 minute interval run on the treadmill or track. I walk you through the workout step-by-step in my Fit For Duty workout Program for law enforcement applicants.

Corrections Officer/Prison Guard Fitness Test Workout Routine

Here’s how you do a bodyweight circuit to get ready for your test. Remember if you want a more in-dept workout loaded with exercise pictures, meal plans, and graph visit Fit For Duty Workouts

a) Pick 3 lower body exercises

b) Pick 3 upper body exercises

c) Alternate between a lower and upper body exercise without rest, till you are done all 6 exercises

d) Rest a minute.

e) Repeat 2-3 more times until you are done 20 minutes

For example, this is a great circuit that doesn’t need any equipment

1) Prisoner Squat (12 repetitions)
2) Elevated Pushups (8 reps per side)
3) Single-Leg Deadlift (10 reps per side)
4) Close-grip Pushups (As many reps as possible)
5) Jumping Jacks (30-60 reps)
6) Cross-Body Mountain Climber (12 reps per side)

Whew. That’s pretty advanced…for a beginner, we’d slow it down like this and take some breaks between exercises…

1) Wall Squat (8 reps)
2) Kneeling Elevated Pushup (5 reps per side)
3) Lying 1-leg Hip Extension (8 reps per side)
4) Plank (30 second hold)
5) Jumping Jacks (5-10 reps)
6) Side Plank (15 second hold per side)

Good luck on your test, and of course, always check with your doctor before beginning any exercise program. For more information, visit Fit For Duty Workouts.

Corrections Officer Test Advice For Applicants

If you’re planning on taking the correctional officer test in the near future, you must know that preparation is extremely important. If you are able to, I encourage you to start studying for the exam as soon as you possibly can.

Seriously don’t show up on the day of the test under prepared. If you can afford it, I suggest investing in a Correctional Officer Study Guide days or even weeks before your test.

The Civil Service Exam For CO’s

The correctional officer civil service exam was designed as a tool to measure a potential candidates judgment, reasoning, and reading capabilities through various exercises. Some applicants have sailed through this test, while  other have failed miserably.

Here are the six major test categories you’ll likely see on the Correctional officer exam:

  • Mathematics
  • Reading/Writing Comprehension
  • Spelling/Grammar
  • Vocabulary
  • Incident Writing
  • Memory Recognition

Again if you are weak in any of the sections above, I suggest investing in a  study guide if possible.  You can get a resourceful book at your local book store or download one here.

Here are some benefits of a correctional officer study guide:

  • Access to Practice Exams – It is time to stop guessing and find out what questions are on the exam.
  • Exact topics on the exam and Their Purpose – Getting the right answer is easier when you know what they want to hear
  • How to Answer Trap Questions – Every exam will throw in questions to destroy momentum and disqualify you. Learn how to identify them and answer them.
  • In Depth Analysis of the Toughest Questions – Instead of just getting an answer key, you’re going to get a full analysis.
  • And Much, Much, More

I hope this article has helped in some way.

 

County Deputy Sheriff corrections officer exam practice questions

Correctional Officer Test Advice – Pass The Exam

Across the country, there are many career opportunities in corrections. Qualifying tests are part of the application process for most positions. Make sure you’re prepared with a step-by-step Corrections Officer Test study guide. You’ll get familiar with the types of questions you’ll encounter and discover what you still need to study.

Corrections Officer Study Guide

The Correction Officer Exam is your gateway to a career maintaining security and safety in correctional camps and state facilities. Test topics include observation and memory, decision-making, spatial orientation, and English usage.

How To Prepare For Test

Prepare yourself by informing yourself. Arm yourself with hard facts about the correctional officer exam, which are yours for the asking from the recruiter, the department’s HR section, or the department website.

Identify your weakest areas on the test and reinforce your abilities in that area. Review spelling rules. Pick up, “The Elements of Style” by Strunk & White, and a high school level math book while you’re at it. Then find a quiet spot with no distractions — like the library, and study.

The corrections officer examination consists of several sections… Here’s just four of them:

  • OBSERVATION AND RECALL: Measures your ability to make detailed observations on the basis of written, oral and visual data and recall the data clearly and accurately.
  • COGNITIVE ABILITIES: Measures your ability to think toward a good conclusion.
  • PERSONAL MATURITY AND INTEGRITY: Measures your ability to handle situations requiring strong personal ethics as well as the ability to make mature calm decisions in difficult situations.
  • WRITTEN AND ORAL COMMUNICATION: Measures your ability to use proper grammar, spelling and punctuation in preparing written documents. It also measures your ability to read text books, statutes and procedural orders commonly found in the job setting.

If you are weak in any of the sections above, I suggest investing in a study guide if possible. You can get a resourceful book at your local book store or download one here.

Here are some benefits of a correctional officer study guide:

  • Access to Practice Exams – It is time to stop guessing and find out what questions are on the exam.
  • Exact topics on the exam and Their Purpose – Getting the right answer is easier when you know what they want to hear
  • How to Answer Trap Questions – Every exam will throw in questions to destroy momentum and disqualify you. Learn how to identify them and answer them.
  • In Depth Analysis of the Toughest Questions – Instead of just getting an answer key, you’re going to get a full analysis.
  • And Much, Much, More

I hope this article has helped in some way.

correctional officer civil service exam handbook

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Los Angeles County California Los Angeles
Cook County Illinois Chicago
Harris County Texas Houston
Maricopa County Arizona Phoenix
San Diego County California San Diego
Orange County California Santa Ana
Kings County New York Brooklyn
Dallas County Texas Dallas
Miami-Dade County Florida Miami
Queens County New York Kew Gardens, Queens
Riverside County California Riverside
San Bernardino County California San Bernardino
Wayne County Michigan Detroit
King County Washington Seattle
Clark County Nevada Las Vegas
Tarrant County Texas Fort Worth
Santa Clara County California San Jose
Broward County Florida Fort Lauderdale
Bexar County Texas San Antonio
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Suffolk County New York Riverhead
Middlesex County Massachusetts Cambridge and Lowell
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El Paso County Texas El Paso
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Jefferson County Kentucky Louisville
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Oklahoma County Oklahoma Oklahoma City
Cobb County Georgia Marietta
Lake County Illinois Waukegan
Jackson County Missouri Independence
Snohomish County Washington Everett
Will County Illinois Joliet
San Joaquin County California Stockton
Norfolk County Massachusetts Dedham
Jefferson County Alabama Birmingham
Denton County Texas Denton
Monmouth County New Jersey Freehold Borough
Bernalillo County New Mexico Albuquerque
Baltimore City Maryland Baltimore
Davidson County Tennessee Nashville
Providence County Rhode Island Providence
Bucks County Pennsylvania Doylestown
Denver County Colorado Denver
Kent County Michigan Grand Rapids
deputy sheriff
sheriff’s deputy
sheriff department

correctional officers Test online practice exam

When you made your decision to become a correctional officer, you made a decision to change your life. And when you turned in your application, you took your first step in a grueling process towards achieving your goal.

Next in the gauntlet: the Corrections Officer Test.

The first hurdle. The first cold sweat in a long line of cold sweats. Now’s the time to untie the knot in your stomach and re-tighten your guts to prepare for the first punch of reality: you’re actually on your way to becoming a correctional officer.

Whether you hate tests or you ace tests to draw a bead on living your life behind a badge, you need to turn your mind into a diamond-dust whet stone and hone your wits razor-sharp. Your goal in the correctional officer written test, your first step towards your badge, is simple and single-minded: get the highest scores possible on the exam for the highest ranking possible on the eligibility list.

Test Day Advice:

Tips On How to be Successful On The Exam

On test day there will be some nerves. However don’t panic, read some of tips below:

  • Follow the oral and written instructions that are given to you during the orientation session before each test section. Failure to follow instructions can be detrimental to your testing and you could be disqualified for failure to follow instructions. Therefore, don’t be afraid to ask the test proctor for help if you do not understand the instructions.
  • Familiarize yourself with the time limits for each section and be aware of how much time you have used. You can check your remaining time periodically during the test. It is your responsibility to manage your time. If you do not know the answer to a question, skip it and come back to the question later. Do not spend too much time on one question. If you run out of time, questions you do not answer are counted as incorrect.
  • It is to your advantage to answer all of the test questions. If you are not sure which answer is correct, eliminate choices you know are wrong. If you can narrow the number of choices, you increase your chances of answering the question correctly.
  • If time allows, check your answers. Be sure you have answered all of the questions in the section.
  • Rely on your own ability; do not cheat. Anyone caught cheating or attempting to cheat will be disqualified and his or her test results will be invalidated and the testing process will be stopped.

For Practice Questions, Visit The Pass The Corrections Officer Webpage:

State Corrections Officer Exam – State Prison Written Test

Whether you want to become a corrections officer for the state, federal or county there are some strict requirements that you’ll have to meet before you are offered the job.  Some of the more notable qualifications to become a CO is as followed:

  • You must have high diploma or GED
  • You must not have been convicted of a felony
  • You must not have been convicted of domestic battery
  • You must have a valid driver’s license
  • You must be at least 19 years old. However some states requirement you to be 21
  • You must successfully complete all phases of the selection process
  • You must pass the background check, polygraph, physical abilities test

The above requirements are just general information that most recruits should be familiar with, and are mandatory if you plan on applying. Other common requirements are you must pass the corrections officer entrance exam. The jailer’s test is pretty important so make sure you are prepared by looking over practice questions and answers.

About The Correctional Officer Exam

The corrections officer test was designed to select the most qualified applicant through varies judgment and reasoning focused exercises. Normally the Correctional Officer Civil Service Exam is multiple choice with around 100-200 or so questions. Usually the exam is timed, however there should be plenty of time to complete the test.  The exam consist of 5-6 major test categories, and they are as followed:

  • Grammar/Spelling
  • Incident Report Writing
  • Vocabulary
  • Reading and writing comprehension
  • Memory Recognition

There are several jailer study guides out that can prepare you for the test. I’d suggest at the very least to look over some sample questions before taking your next exam. Good  luck!

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Los Angeles County Corrections Officer Test

Correctional officers working inside the Los Angeles County jail are there to maintain constant supervision over sometimes violent offenders. The question remains why would any person want to work inside a correctional facility where inmates are vying to take advantage of you anytime the opportunity presents itself.

Although I cannot answer for every correctional officer in the country, but my biggest guest is the pay, health insurance and career growth are just too tempting. Many jailers will tell you that the reward out weighs the risk, and I tend to believe that. The numbers of correctional officers that are actually injured while on duty is very minimal.

INSIDE THE LOS ANGELES COUNTY CORRECTIONAL OFFICER TEST

The format for the correctional officer test (also known as the deputy sheriff exam or jailer’s exam) is structured pretty much the same as any other civil service examination for CO’s. You’ll likely be tested in the following sections…

Memory Recognization -The memory and observation portion assesses a candidate’s ability to observe and recall information. Test takers study images or verbal descriptions of a crime scene, prison scene or other events. After a short time, the test administrator removes the material and asks them to recall particular details.

Judgment and Reasoning – The situational reasoning section evaluates a candidate’s ability to analyze a given scenario and identify the appropriate regulation for it. Test takers read a set of facts or narrative account of a typical event that occurs in a correctional setting and determine which set of rules, regulations or directives apply.

Reading Comprehension – Reading comprehension determines how well a candidate can extract information from a written passage. Test takers read a selection of text and answer a set of questions, the answers being embedded in the text. They do not need independent knowledge of the subject matter.

Verbal reasoning tests a candidate’s ability to organize and present written material. Some questions will have test takers read a paragraph and then choose the best of several restatements of that paragraph. Other questions will consist of short paragraphs with their sentences out of order, which test takers must arrange in the correct order.

That is just some of the sections that you’ll likely see on the jailer’s test. If you to review sample test questions before you take the test click here.

Correctional Officer Practice Test Book

Are you struggling to find practice questions that will likely be on the corrections officer test? Don’t panic because you can get tons of sample questions here.

The corrections officer test is like any other exam – the more prepared you are, the better your chances of getting a satisfactory score.. Leading up to the exam, some applicants benefit from looking over preparation books, while others may sit through a prep course offered by private companies.

Whatever way you decide to go in terms of getting prepared for the test is legal. Studying up for the exam beforehand is perfectly fine so take advantage of it.

There are several online corrections officer study guide out there, but I recommend this one because of the vast amount of sample questions included in the manual.

Correctional Officer Exam Format:

The corrections officer written examination is made up of 6-8 major test categories, and they are as followed…

  • Mathematics
  • Spelling/Grammar
  • Reading Comprehension
  • Verbal Communications
  • Vocabulary
  • Judgment and Reasoning
  • Memory Recognition

Good luck on your exam. Hope this article have helped you in some way.

corrections officer practice test

Unless you are serious about becoming a corrections officer don’t bother reading through this article. This website is dedicated to motivated individuals who are truly serious about getting into law enforcement.

On of the steps that you’ll have to successfully complete before becoming a corrections officer is getting a satisfactory score on the written exam. You see, the corrections officer exam is very important, and getting a high score on it is even more important.

The Correctional officer test like the background check was designed to sift through bad applicants who won’t make good officers. Some candidates do well on the civil service test, while others fail miserably.

Civil Service Test Format:

The correctional officer civil service test usually consist of about 6-8 major sections, and they are as followed…

  • Judgment And Reasoning
  • Memory Recall
  • Spelling/Grammar
  • Vocabulary
  • Reading Comprehension
  • Verbal Communication
  • Report Writing

Good Luck on your correctional officer test. Hope this blog post have helped you in some way.

Correctional officer test

The civil service corrections officer test is used as a  screening methods to gauge a candidate’s readiness to work in a correctional facility.

The written exam is just one component of the overall selection process. Knowing the rationale for this test and having a realistic idea of the job can improve your chance to demonstrate your job potential.

That’s why it is so important to look over a correctional officer exam study guide before you take the test. You will be a lot more prepared for the test if you know what to expect in advance.

The examination will focus on learning more about you. The exam is designed to assess…

  • How well you observe things and how well you remember what you’ve just observed
  • Your basic writing skills
  • Your basic reading skills
  • Verbal communication skills

The correctional officer exam is made up of 4-6 separately-timed test sections. The first three sections will probably be Mathematics, Reading Comprehension and Grammar in multiple choice or true/false formats.

The fourth section might be Incident Report Writing. This section will require you to write out your answers in complete sentences in the spaces provided in the test booklet.

Attempt to answer every question on the test. There is no penalty for guessing because your score is based on the total number of correct answers.

This means you should respond to every question, even when you are not certain of the correct answer. When you are uncertain, your answer should be your best guess, and you should then move on to the next question.